Title

Computational inference of a genomic pluripotency signature in human and mouse stem cells.

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

9-17-2016

JAX Source

Biol Direct 2016 Sep 17; 11:47

PMID

27639379

Abstract

UNLABELLED: Recent analyses of next-generation sequencing datasets have shown that cell-specific regulatory elements in stem cells are marked with distinguishable patterns of transcription factor (TF) binding and epigenetic marks. For example, we recently demonstrated that promoters of cell-specific genes are covered with expanded trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 4 (H3K4me3) marks (i.e., broad H3K4me3 domains). Moreover, binding of specific TFs, such as OCT4, NANOG, and SOX2, have been shown to play a critical role in maintaining the pluripotency of stem cells. Despite these observations, a systematic exploration of genomic and epigenomic features of stem-cell-specific gene promoters has not been conducted. Advanced machine-learning models can capture distinguishable genomic and epigenomic characteristics of stem-cell-specific promoters by taking advantage of the wealth of publicly available datasets. Here, we propose a three-step framework to discover novel data characteristics of high-throughput next generation sequencing datasets that distinguish pluripotency genes in human and mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Our framework involves: i) feature extraction to identify novel features of genomic datasets; ii) feature selection using a logistic regression model combined with the Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator (LASSO) method to find the most critical datasets and features; and iii) cross validation with features selected using LASSO method to assess the predictive power of selected data features in distinguishing pluripotency genes. We show that specific epigenetic marks, and specific features of these marks, are enriched at pluripotency gene promoters. Moreover, we also assess both the individual and combined effect of TF binding, epigenetic mark deposition, gene expression datasets for marking pluripotency genes. Our findings are consistent with the existence of a conserved, complex and integrative genomic signature in ESCs that can be exploited to flag important candidate pluripotency genes. They also validate our computational framework for fostering a deeper understanding of genomic datasets in stem cells, in the future, could be extended to study cell-type-specific genomic landscapes in other cell types.

REVIEWERS: This article was reviewed by Zoltan Gaspari and Piotr Zielenkiewicz.

Biol Direct 2016 Sep 17; 11:47.