Title

T-Cell-Intrinsic Receptor Interacting Protein 2 Regulates Pathogenic T Helper 17 Cell Differentiation.

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

11-20-2018

Keywords

JGM

JAX Source

Immunity 2018 Nov 20; 49(5):873-885.e7

PMID

30366765

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.immuni.2018.08.022

Abstract

Receptor interacting protein 2 (RIP2) plays a role in sensing intracellular pathogens, but its function in T cells is unclear. We show that RIP2 deficiency in CD4+ T cells resulted in chronic and severe interleukin-17A-mediated inflammation during Chlamydia pneumoniae lung infection, increased T helper 17 (Th17) cell formation in lungs of infected mice, accelerated atherosclerosis, and more severe experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. While RIP2 deficiency resulted in reduced conventional Th17 cell differentiation, it led to significantly enhanced differentiation of pathogenic (p)Th17 cells, which was dependent on RORα transcription factor and interleukin-1 but independent of nucleotide oligomerization domain (NOD) 1 and 2. Overexpression of RIP2 resulted in suppression of pTh17 cell differentiation, an effect mediated by its CARD domain, and phenocopied by a cell-permeable RIP2 CARD peptide. Our data suggest that RIP2 has a T cell-intrinsic role in determining the balance between homeostatic and pathogenic Th17 cell responses.

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