Document Type

Article

Publication Date

12-11-2020

Keywords

JGM, JAXCC

JAX Source

Nat Commun 2020 Dec 11; 11(1):6367

PMID

33311458

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-20030-5

Grant

CA230031

Abstract

Histopathological images are a rich but incompletely explored data type for studying cancer. Manual inspection is time consuming, making it challenging to use for image data mining. Here we show that convolutional neural networks (CNNs) can be systematically applied across cancer types, enabling comparisons to reveal shared spatial behaviors. We develop CNN architectures to analyze 27,815 hematoxylin and eosin scanned images from The Cancer Genome Atlas for tumor/normal, cancer subtype, and mutation classification. Our CNNs are able to classify TCGA pathologist-annotated tumor/normal status of whole slide images (WSIs) in 19 cancer types with consistently high AUCs (0.995 ± 0.008), as well as subtypes with lower but significant accuracy (AUC 0.87 ± 0.1). Remarkably, tumor/normal CNNs trained on one tissue are effective in others (AUC 0.88 ± 0.11), with classifier relationships also recapitulating known adenocarcinoma, carcinoma, and developmental biology. Moreover, classifier comparisons reveal intra-slide spatial similarities, with an average tile-level correlation of 0.45 ± 0.16 between classifier pairs. Breast cancers, bladder cancers, and uterine cancers have spatial patterns that are particularly easy to detect, suggesting these cancers can be canonical types for image analysis. Patterns for TP53 mutations can also be detected, with WSI self- and cross-tissue AUCs ranging from 0.65-0.80. Finally, we comparatively evaluate CNNs on 170 breast and colon cancer images with pathologist-annotated nuclei, finding that both cellular and intercellular regions contribute to CNN accuracy. These results demonstrate the power of CNNs not only for histopathological classification, but also for cross-comparisons to reveal conserved spatial behaviors across tumors.

Comments

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.

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