Title

Genetic Models of Macrophage Depletion.

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2018

JAX Location

Reprint Collection

JAX Source

Methods Mol Biol 2018; 1784:243-258

PMID

29761404

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-7837-3_22

Abstract

Macrophages are a heterogeneous population of innate immune cells and are distributed in most adult tissues. Certain tissue-resident macrophages with a prenatal origin, together with postnatal monocyte-derived macrophages, serve as the host scavenger system to eliminate invading pathogens, malignant cells, senescent cells, dead cells, cellular debris, and other foreign substances. As a key member of the mononuclear phagocyte system, macrophages play essential roles in regulation of prenatal development, tissue homeostasis, and disease progression. Over the past two decades, considerable efforts have been made to generate genetic models of macrophage ablation in mice. These models support investigations of the precise functions of tissue-specific macrophages under physiological and pathological conditions. Herein, we overview the currently available mouse strains for in vivo genetic ablation of macrophages and discuss their respective advantages and limitations. Methods Mol Biol 2018; 1784:243-258.

Please contact the Joan Staats Library for information regarding this document.

Share

COinS